Do MDs bully and scare their patients into surgery, drugs and chemo?  Absolutely.  I have had numerous clients complain about their interactions with MDs.  Most clients do not want to do surgery or chemo. However,  most specialists and surgeons won’t tell you your options – because it’s bad for business.

When there are forms for “informed consent”, they are intended to satisfy the lawyers, not the patient.

Unfortunately, it is only those people who do their research who know that they have options.surgery

According to statistics we have the following:

  • 70% percent of hysterectomies were prescribed incorrectly
  • 22.5% of pacemakers were inserted without good reason
  • 17% of spinal-fusion back surgeries were performed without medical scans or neurological tests to support the procedures
  • 12% of angioplasties with stents were unwarranted
  • Arthritic knees rarely perform better after arthroscopic surgery to repair the joint’s buffer cartilage
  • Three Pennsylvania surgeons attempted to remove gall bladders from three different patients who had already had their bladder removed!

1. Eisler, P., and Hansen, B. “Doctors perform thousands of unnecessary surgeries.” USA TODAY. June 20, 2013. usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/06/18/unnecessary-surgery-usa-today-investigation/2435009/. Retrieved on 5-14-2015.
2. Eisler,P. “Six common surgeries often done unnecessarily.” USA TODAY.June 19, 2013. usatoday. com/story/news/health/2013/06/19/surgeries-unnecessary-patients-medical/2439075/. Retrieved 5-14-2015.
3. Eisler, P. and Hansen, B. “Why you should get a second opinion before getting surgery.” USA TODAY. June 20, 2013. usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/06/19/surgery-second-opinion-interactive/2439275/. Retrieved 5-15-2015.
4. Sihvonen, R., et al. “Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy versus sham surgery for a degenerative meniscal tear.” N Engl J Med 2013; 369:2515-2524December 26, 2013DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1305189.
5. Mosely, J.B., et al. “A controlled trial of arthroscopic surgery for osteoarthritis of the knee.” N Engl J Med 2002; 347:81-88July 11, 2002DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa013259.
6. Staff. “Risk of unnecessary gall bladder surgery. Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory. PA PSRS Patient Saf Advis 2004 Dec;1(4):3-4. patientsafetyauthority.org/ADVISORIES/AdvisoryLibrary/2004/dec1%284%29/ Pages/03.aspx.

Why does this happen?  For a number of reasons:

  • 1) greed
  • 2) incompetence
  • 3) ignorance

USA Today reported:  “Then there are those providers who perform the surgery simply because the profit will increase their income, and they can justify them as medically ‘necessary.’ (USA Today June 20, 2013)

‘I think there are a very small percent of doctors who are crooked, maybe 1 or 2%,’ says John Santa, a physician and former health system administrator who became director of the Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center in 2008.

‘I think there’s a higher percentage who are not well trained or not competent’ to determine when surgery is necessary, Santa says. ‘Then you have a big group who are more businessmen than medical professionals — doctors who look at those gray cases and say, ‘Well, I have enough here to justify surgery, so I’m going to do it.””

Dr Mercola wrote:  (http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/07/10/unnecessary-surgeries.aspx)

Diagnostic Errors Permanently Injure or Kill Up to 160,000 Americans a Year

Unnecessary surgeries are only one problem facing the conventional medical system. Medical errors are also alarmingly common, and diagnosis errors, in particular, appear to be occurring at very high rates. Researchers recently wrote in BMJ Quality & Safety:14

Among malpractice claims, diagnostic errors appear to be the most common, most costly and most dangerous of medical mistakes. We found roughly equal numbers of lethal and non-lethal errors in our analysis, suggesting that the public health burden of diagnostic errors could be twice that previously estimated.”

The study involved more than 350,000 malpractice claims, of which nearly 29 percent involved a missed, wrong or delayed diagnosis. Such errors may account for the permanent injury or death of up to 160,000 patients each year, the study found, with researchers noting that “it is probably a lot higher than that.”15 Case in point, when all medical errors, not just diagnosis errors, are taken into account, the rate of medical harm occurring in the US is estimated to be over 40,000 harmful and/or lethal errors each and EVERY day.16

Unfortunately, some MDs work in accordance with what they know and are familiar with.  They don’t want appear ignorant and so push simply what they know…they don’t teach how to prevent or any of the alternative methods – simply because they do not know them and chose not to learn about them…so they remain dependent on what Big Pharma teaches them…and of course Big Pharma has a responsibility to improve profits for their shareholders.

This approach to medicine/healing doesn’t just apply to MDs but also to therapists.  How many psychologist, psychiatrists, social workers, life therapists have been trained in nutrition, toxicities, microbiota, etc.  Sorry, it just doesn’t happen.  They all provide you, the client, with what they were taught in school.  Typically reliant on the “old Men’s Club”.

If your health has gone sideways, you want to look at a variety of different types of practitioners for second, third opinions, etc.  Note, physicians are most likely to just support the prior opinion…they avoid litigation that way.

As always, do your research.  Know what you are doing.  What are your options.  What are the long term results.

Find Health Practitioners who are willing to work with you.  Who encourage your own research and invite questions.  Who are willing to teach and advise.  Avoid those who want to bully you.

Here’s to your health!

For more information, contact: Dr Holly at holly@choicesunlimited.ca

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